Tumulte wieder mal im Mafia Parlament von Albanien

Posted on Februar 11, 2011 von

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Im Club der „Alkoholiker und Mafiosi“, beschuldigt man sich gegenseitig der Korruption und Mafiöser Zirkel, wo dann die Klein Kind Parlaments Präsidentin, einseitig sich austoben darf, und möglichst auch noch ihren Unsinn verbreiten darf. 3 Abgeordnete haben nun ersteinmal 15 Tage, Parlaments Verbot.

Die derzeitige Albanische Regierung, ist die ordinärste Betrug und Korruption Regierung des Balkans. Vor allem funktioniert praktisch erneut, wie in 2004 Nichts mehr, und korrupte Regierungs Beamte, verstecken sich hinter der Immunität und die Justiz und Staatsanwältin, wird massiv seit 3 Jahren bekämpft, obwohl aus der selben Partei, wie der Staatspräsident.

Ansonsten kümmert sich die Parlaments Präsident, Josefina Topalli darum das die dümmsten Verwandten ohne jegliche Schule u.a. General Konsul in Mailand werden, oder die Tochter eine Bar Sängerin, mit ebenso niedrigen Bildungs Standard, erhielt einen Diplomaten Pass und führt in Paris ein lustiges Leben.

Höhepunkte der Bestechlichkeit und des Betruges sind vor allem und wie immer die Ilir Meta Zirkel, der Skrapari Bande rund auch den ausgelieferten Staatssekretär Almir Rrapo, oder rund um Lizenzen.

10 Feb 2011 / 14:39

Albanian MPs Throw Punches, Insults as Work Resumes

In a tense parliamentary session, the first since the January 21 unrest in the country, the ruling majority and the opposition accused one another of murder, while throwing a few punches and many more insults.

Besar Likmeta

Tirana The session had to be interrupted after Democratic Party MP Edi Paloka and his Socialist colleague, Armando Prenga, got into a scuffle, which then escalated into a minor brawl.

Earlier, the heads of the two parliamentary groups from the majority and the opposition held speeches in which they blamed each other for the death of four protesters during the January 21 opposition demonstration.

A good part of the session after the break consisted of opposition MPs standing and hurling insults, while Defence Minister Arben Imami shouted accusations from the podium.

Following the brawl and after the minister refused to allow a reply to his remarks on the same topic, the opposition walked out of the session.

The protest of January 21 turned into a riot when several hundred marchers attacked the police barricade set up to protect the prime minister’s office, using sticks, stones and Molotov cocktails.

Police responded with tear gas, water cannons and later with live ammunition fire, leaving four dead and dozens wounded.

Tensions have been boiling over between the two feuding parties over the last three weeks, aggravating an already poisoned political climate, which has been in a troubled state since the June 2009 parliamentary elections.

Prime Minister Sali Berisha claims that his government is the victim of a failed coup attempt, part of the January 21 protests, orchestrated by the Socialists, the president, the secret service, the general prosecutor and four journalists.

Meanwhile, opposition leader Edi Rama accuses Berisha of turning a peaceful protest into a bloodbath and attacking any institution that does not agree with his version of the facts.

In a message to the Albanian people after meeting with local political leaders on Wednesday, US Undersecretary of State Thomas Countryman called speculation from parties about what happened on January 21 “irresponsible.”

President Bamir Topi, speaking in a press conference on Wednesday, also appealed to politicians to avoid prejudging the events “before justice had spoken.”

In view of today’s scene in parliament, such appeals seem to have fallen on deaf ears.

US Official Delivers Strong Message to Troubled Albania

US Undersecretary of State Thomas Countryman told Albanians in a televised message on Wednesday that they should look to their constitution and institutions to overcome the country’s political crisis.

Besar Likmeta

Tirana

“Albania is not the only European democracy that employs protests as a means of political expression and sadly is not the only European democracy that has seen protests end in violence,” Countryman said.

“All of these events, in a constitutional democracy, must be addressed by constitutional means,” he added.

Countryman’s statement came after meeting the country’s main political actors and President Bamir Topi in the wake of the January 21 unrest that left four people dead and dozens wounded.

Albania’s main political parties, the Democrats of Prime Minister Sali Berisha and the Socialists headed by Tirana mayor Edi Rama, have been in conflict since the violent protest three weeks ago, blaming each other for the deaths.

Berisha claims that his government was the victim of a failed coup attempt orchestrated by the Socialists, the president, the secret service, the general prosecutor and four journalists.

Meanwhile, Rama accuses Berisha of turning a peaceful protest into a bloodbath and attacking any institution that does not agree with his version of the facts.

The protest of January 21 turned into a riot when several hundred marchers attacked the police barricade set up to protect the prime minister’s office, using sticks, stones and Molotov cocktails.

Police responded with tear gas, water cannons and later with live ammunition fire, leaving four dead and dozens wounded.

In his speech, Countryman touched on three areas that are considered to be at the root of Albania’s crisis: corruption, disputed elections, and the protests. He stressed that although they remain serious challenges to overcome, the only way to solve them is through institutions.

He sent a clear a message to the opposition not to boycott the May 8 local elections; a move that threatens to further aggravate the current political and institutional crisis.

“The people of Albania deserve the right to choose between parties, which means parties should participate in such elections,” he said.

“Blocking elections is an example of a non-constitutional and anti-constitutional action that is not deserving of a European democracy,” Countryman added.

The US official reteirated his country’s support for prosecutor general Ina Rama and her probe to shed light on the January 21 events.

“We support the independence of the prosecutor general who must be able to do her job without political pressure,” Countryman said.

He also expressed his disappointment with Albania’s political parties, and called on the Albanian people to hold on to their aspirations as a NATO member and possible EU candidate.

“Politics might seem like everything, but there is a higher value when you commit to being a member of NATO and when you aspire to be a member of the European Union,” Countryman said.

“Both NATO and the European Union are values based organisations, and those values are greater than the political interests of one party or another,” he added.

Posted in: Albania